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IT Futures Summit 2017: Highlights & This Year’s IT Jeopardy Champs

Getting to Know You Futures in IT Summit 2017

IT Futures Summit: 2017

Highlights…

With registrations almost double, the Center of Excellence for Information & Computing Technologies’ IT Futures Summit took place on May 18/19, 2017 at the Mercer Island Community & Event Center. IT faculty from across the state attended for a 1.5 day experience that featured another IT industry professional panel discussing and exploring disruptive technology (focusing on robotics/AI). Small group discussions looked at college’s IT programs, challenges, strengths, and new program and degree developments. Mark Neufville of Spokane Falls Community College presented his current work with the Center’s NAO robot and did a robotic demonstration.

The Center’s director, Maureen Majury, M.Ed., discussed the curriculum development, a robotic/AI survey course, and the work-to-date with the proposed robotic/AI AA/BAS. A special guest was Mr. Albert Lewis, Vice President for Economic and Workforce Development at Bellevue College, who talked about the process of developing a regional IT committee and its work on strengthening relationships between IT programs and area IT and IT-enabled companies.

Finally, on Friday, the popular IT Jeopardy returned with a new set of 50 questions, three daily doubles and a final Jeopardy question (topic: The 1%rs: Wealthy Tech Leaders).

Meet our 2017 IT Jeopardy Champions (left to right):

IT Futures Summit 2017 IT Jeopardy Winners May 19 2017

Mark Neufville Spokane Falls Community College

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Neuvfille, Spokane Falls Community College, Computer Science & Information Systems, was also on the winning team, however, he left right before the game ended. He traveled to Bellevue College to teach a module for the Robotics/AI survey course. The students found out all about the NAO robot.

This team won by $100 in final Jeopardy. Everyone get ready for IT Jeopardy: 2018 as it will be another blowout match-up!

Greg Rehm Bellingham Technical CollegeShout out to Greg Rehm, Bellingham Technical College: The answer to “The communication process between devices and networking which enables these objects to collect/exchange data” is not “Voodoo.” It’s “What is the Internet of Things.

 

 

 

 

The following are available to all WA State IT Program CTC faculty from the Summit:

WA Info Tech Talks Let Us Entertain You MM EL 0416

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Creating IT Futures: 2017 Summit

Creating IT Futures

CREATING IT FUTURES: 2017 SUMMIT (May 18-19, 2017 free for IT CTC faculty)

You are invited…

Who:  Up to three IT CTC Faculty from each college (Note:  a $300 (maximum) per faculty stipend to offset travel costs will be allocated upon delivery of receipts totaling up to $300 for faculty from Central, Eastern, North and South Western Washington to encourage attendance and engagement at this event) and select IT industry professionals.

Faculty who attended the May 19/20, 2016 IT Futures Summit will be given the three slots to attend.  If faculty who did not attend that event register and those slots aren’t filled with the 2016 attendees, then their registration will be accepted in their place.  Be sure to coordinate with your Academic or Workforce Administrator to ensure this attendance coordination is understood.  If you want to send more than three educators from your college, please contact the Center at maureen.majury@bellevuecollege or call 425.564.4229.

What:  Will be happening? Participants will experience presentations, network, and address any issues discussed at the the May 2016 Summit (held at the Mercer Island Community & Event Center), including:

  • Updates on CoE project and services,
  • Update on the IT statewide marketing plan,
  • Robotics and IT, IT in the Trades, and disruptive and emerging technologies,
  • An industry panel,
  • A robot presentation,
  • New topics for discussion, including SBCTC updates, new BAS degrees
  • IT Jeopardy 2017 (Who will triumph?)
  • Connections with industry professionals about the state of the IT (and, IT-enabled) industry,
  • and, more…

The draft 2017 Agenda should be ready by February 2017.

Where:  Mercer Island Community & Event Center, 8236 SE 24th Street, Mercer Island, WA 98040/tel (206) 275-7609, The Mercer Room.

When:  10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Thursday, May 18, 2017 & 10:0 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Friday, May 19, 2017

Why:  Everyone has worked very hard to collaborate and create solutions that make it easier for IT faculty and students access and succeed in completing an IT program of study in the CTC system and enter the workforce prepared to meet employer needs.  We need to continue our collective work together and explore and create new innovative solutions for our system.

Requirements:
1.  After you register, you will be sent additional information as we near the event (with enough time if there is something to consider or work on).  You will also receive an agenda for the two-day event as we come closer to the May event.
2. Register by Friday, April 28, 2018.
3. Review materials that will be sent to you before the Summit and be prepared to discuss, brainstorm, and make decisions.
4.  If possible bring your laptop or tablet.  There is wifi at the event.

Food will be provided (Thursday: breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack, Friday: breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack).

Recommended hotel:  The Hyatt House near Bellevue College (easy access to 1-90, and then you can hop off and reach the Mercer Island Community Center very easily). However, for our out-of-town guests, with the stipend you can decide where you want to stay.  Mention my name, the Center of Excellence, and Bellevue College to get the government rate.
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Where is the Unified Global Approach to Ethics in Robotics and AI: If We Can’t Get Along Globally, How Will Our Artificially Intelligent Off-Springs?

Flying ShipWhere is the Unified Global Approach to Ethics in Robotics and AI:  If We Can’t Get Along Globally, How Will Our Artificially Intelligent Off-Springs?

Maureen A. Majury, M.Ed.

September 30, 2016
 

Preface

Debate, thought, innovation, and creation of standards exist for determining the ethical behavior of robots and artificial intelligence (AI), in all its coming iterations and forms. Experts in computer science, economics, as well as other fields, speculate about, and scan data on workforce disruption, lost jobs, and robots becoming “More Human than Human.” (White Zombie, 1995)

Ethics continue to play a large part of how robots and AI roll out currently and integrate into our societies and the workplace in the near future.  How will robots make ethical decisions?  Everyone’s joining into this discussion and opining without much mutual agreement.  And, every country and professional society or association is quickly planting its stick in the ground and roundly stating, “This is what robotic and AI ethics look like and should be.”

The United Kingdom (UK) recently published the new British Standards Institution (BSI)’s Guideline.  It develops technical and quality guidelines for goods sold in the UK (BS 8611).  The cost in US dollars for this report?  $210.   But who are the noted computer scientists, economists, and great minds behind, Robot Ethics According to About 25 People in the UK?  Unless you buy it you don’t know.

Although robot and AI ethics are the document’s focus, from the free synopsis, it does not delve into a required criterion of detailed behaviors.

What’s ultimately lacking in this, and any other piece or recently formed groups founding principles, are a global agreement on what constitutes ethics and a shared belief system that would be an integrated part of any robot or AI decision-making process.

What might be missing in this discussion…

Ethics, core values, cultural beliefs, religious identification, political selection, morals are all forged not just within a distinct country, but within regions of the country itself.

Each country has its own distinct views of what forms a socially accepted grouping of ethics and values, and, thus, the decision-making process for the majority of contributing member of a distinct society (or, country).  Even if a majority accepts these values and ethics, there is most likely a minority that doesn’t agree, rightly, wrongly, or indifferently.  Also, unifying ethics and values may be in conflict within a country or between differing regions within a country, let alone within a state.

Unquestionably, robots will transition from unthinking, rote automatons into creative, analytical, and contributing members of a country, region, state, or county.

So, we come to a quandary.  Who determines the values and ethics, the moral decisions, that will drive a functioning robot/AI as action-taker or decision-maker across the globe whilst existing in a society?  While the UK has the shadow decision-makers of the British Standards group, who will only share what constitutes decision-making for a robot from the age old monotone of Asimov, “Do no harm to humans,” one must agree much larger questions loom.

Globally, conflict is based upon differing economic, religious, moral, historical memories, and political beliefs, which expand into views on ethnicity, gender, race, sex, etc.  What if every country programs robots and AI to match its majority values and opinions on things like the value of a male child over a female child, the value of a factory worker over that of a highly effective financial broker, the value of a dog versus a cat?  This presents a rather large conundrum over what constitutes the best value system of that country, let alone the globe, on who and how one should program the robot.  And, who should be looking over their shoulder.

We could look at a situation where a homeless person is asking for money. Many might wonder how the money would be used.  Some might examine the words on the homeless person’s cardboard sign.   Others might look at the physical appearance of the destitute individual.  These considerations and decisions must be decided upon when programming a robot.  Because the question we all will want an answer to is, will the robot give the homeless person money.

Other examples confront those in choosing the best value system to program a robot.  What constitutes an “ethical kill,” for example?  Does that term really even exist in the field of ethics, or is it a term created for the justification of military action.  One doesn’t know.

Or what if one country considers theft a minor crime, but in another it is considered a capital offense?   Adultery may be grounds for counseling or divorce in one country, but what if in another it’s grounds for flogging?

So, in the end, is each country going to create more indestructible, resolute, rigid robotic/AI versions of its own majority?  If we can’t agree on what constitutes a shared set of ethics and values globally, what does this foreshadow for commonality as the “Ethics Policy Monitors” (both non-profits and big tech companies) are rapidly starting to individually assemble in each country to determine what’s acceptable behavior for robots and AI-entities?

…The sadness of watching the future unfold is the remembering.

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Robotics and Automation: A Retrospective and the Reality of Bot Nation

Robotics and Automation

Click on the image above to download the PDF

Robotics: “The Fourth Industrial Revolution” Initially it appears there was never going to be a connection between artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, nanotechnology, 3D printing, biotechnology and deep machine learning. Looking ahead these fields and technological advances will experience rapid evolutions paving the way for interconnectedness and close relationships to each other. “Concurrent to this technological revolution are a set of broader socio-economic, geopolitical and demographic developments, each interacting in multiple directions and intensifying each another.”

It is projected between 2018 and 2020 the following will happen:

  • Robots will be able to see, smell, feel, move like enhanced humans, and be able to pass a Turing test.
  • It will make more sense from the perspectives of industry, government, consumers to have robots execute tasks and jobs that humans have historically performed.
  • Robotics and automation will impact jobs across all industries, but most critically in the manufacturing and service industries.
  • Cars, trucks, trains, planes, and automobiles will become partially or fully autonomous by 2020. • Because of robotic advances, a majority of our global workforce in administrative and professional services will find themselves replaced.
  • STEM jobs will continue to grow.

Manufacturing and production jobs will continue to experience loss. These type of industry job losses may stabilize by 2020. The people who will lose their jobs due to automation or robotic replacements will still have a relatively good potential for learning new technical knowledge and skills to use as work productivity will be swifter and nimbler due to technology advancements.

Source: The Future of Jobs, Employment, Skills and Workforce Strategy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

This report has been researched and defined to enable IT program faculty across the state to consider the changes robotics and automation will bring to the workforce, as well as consider what kinds of program or curricular changes they might make to their current IT programs.

Content covers:

  • Section 1: Robotics and Automation: Historical Highlights
  • Section 2: Recent Evolution of Robotics
  • Section 3: Famous Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Automatons (Automated Thinking Machines) in Movies
  • Section 4: Modern Robots
  • Section 5: Examples of Robot Applications in Various Industries
  • Section 6: State of the Robotics Industry
  • Section 7: Exploration into the Future of Robotics
  • Section 8: Job Demand, Trends, and Technical Knowledge and Skills Needed
  • Section 9: Technical Knowledge and Skills Needed for Robotics, AI, Automation, and More
  • Conclusions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2016 IT Jeopardy Champions: The IT Futures Summit

The IT Futures Summit had a panel on disruptive technologies, a presentation by an IBM researcher, an a presentation by Mark Nuefville of Spokane Falls College on the NAO robot, an update on the WA IT Program marketing plan/action taken, the IT Jeopardy game, and more… This was an informative, interactive, and fun event. Look for it next year in May 2017.

The IT Jeopardy game took place on the second day of the event.  In true Jeopardy fashion, the game featured 50 questions with three daily doubles and a final Jeopardy question.

Meet our IT Jeopardy Champions from left to right:

IT Jeopardy Champions 2016

To say this team dominated is an understatement. Everyone get ready for IT Jeopardy: 2017 as it will be an epic match-up!

The following are available to all WA State IT Program CTC faculty from the Summit:

“There is a catch-22 in Isaac Asimov’s three laws of robotics.  There is a scenario where ethicists have discussed where a robot might be forced to break one or more its laws.  Imagine two-self driving vehicles going towards each other on Highway 101.  Now imagine that the vehicles are just about to cross each other and a large object from the mountains falls right in front of one of them.

To the right of that vehicle there is a cliff, so the vehicle has only two choices: 1.  Allow the collision with the large object to happen, which would prove fatal for the passenger of the car, or 2.  swerve towards the oncoming car, which would be fatal to the passenger of the oncoming vehicle.

What do you think should happen?  Now imagine that one of the cars is transporting children.  Should it respond differently?

Since we are talking about self-driving vehicles (cars), the outcome of this accident would have been pre-determined before the accident happened.  So, ultimately, vehicles (cars) will have to have a method to decide which life is more important and it will mirror the ethics and empathy of those who programmed the vehicles.”

  • Also, don’t forget to listen to the Center’s podcast series, WAInfoTechTalks.org.  We now have 11 episodes that explore with our IT industry guests:
    • Robotics/Automation
    • Hacking/Security
    • Entertainment and Technology
    • Web Development/Design/UX
    • Big Data (Our latest episodes – Listen to the three part podcast on Big Data)

The Cassandra Prophecies

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New Podcasts Series: WaInfoTechTalks Focusing on Disruptive Technologies

The Center of Excellence has launched a brand new podcasts series, WAInfoTechTalks.  Two have been published and three more will be loaded in April for the Center’s first season.

This podcast series focuses on disruptive technology that is, and WILL impact workforce demand in Washington State as well as IT programs (curriculum for degrees and certificates) at our CTCs.

 Rise of the Machines Atlas  rotm2  Podcast 2 Hacking with Dima Protchenko & Maureen Majury 021016  hack2
Rise of the Machines: What Does It Mean?

(Part 1)

Rise of the Machines: What Does It Mean?

(Part 2)

Hacking: What’s It Good For? Absolutely Nothing: However, It’s Good for Bad People (Part 1) Hacking: What’s It Good For? Absolutely Nothing: However, It’s Good for Bad People

(Part 2)

 

Rise of the Machines: Content Summary

Maureen Majury, director for the Center, sits down with Jonny Chambers, Director of Information Technology, University School of Dentistry (formerly at Microsoft) to explore:

  • past and future of robots:
  • how they might take over our jobs and eventually our lives (ok, maybe not)
  • the job outlook in Washington State
  • how predictive was science fiction, film, and television about how robots and automation might replace repetitive tasks and more complex occupations?

There are definitely some entertaining highlights, including the creation and future existence of robot nannies, babies, and pets.

Hacking: What’s it Good For?

Maureen sits down with Dima Protchenko, a software engineer for Healthentic, to discuss:

  • hacking and security in present day and past
  • how it’s portrayed in film.
  • learn what some of the unusual hacking terminology means, such as phishing, fuzzing and Trojan horses.
  • tiptoe into a hot topic in the news: Apple V the FBI – do we know the whole story?

Looking to the future, we have three new Podcasts coming in April for our listeners:

  • entertainment and technology’s impact right now and in the future
  • web design/development/UX
  • Data & Predictive analytics and there will be a follow-up with Dima Protchenko on Apple, ransom ware, and more…

So, follow the Center’s new podcast series, WAInfoTechTalks, to learn more about disruptive technologies impacting everything from the workforce, to IT programs, to how will it impact our everyday life.  Look for upcoming episodes focusing on: Entertainment and Technology, Web Development/Design/UX, and Data Analytics.

You’ll learn, laugh, you might cry (we hope not!)  Just Do It!  Join us as we Talk Tech.

These podcasts were produced at Bellevue College.

 

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Creating IT Futures: 2016 Summit

Creating IT Futures

CREATING IT FUTURES: 2016 SUMMIT

You are invited…

Who:  Up to three IT CTC Faculty from each college (Note:  Per diem for each faculty stipend to offset travel costs will be allocated upon delivery of receipts for faculty traveling over 50 miles to get to the event from Central, Eastern, North and South Western Washington .  This is done in order to encourage attendance and engagement at this event for our friends who have to make the trek to get to this event, as well as select IT industry professionals.

Faculty who attended the May 201t IT Futures Summit will be given the two to three slots to attend.  If faculty who did not attend that event register and those slots aren’t filled with the 2015 attendees, then other registrations will be accepted in their place.  Be sure to coordinate with your Academic or Workforce Administrator to ensure this attendance coordination is understood.  If you want to send more than three educators from your college, please contact the Center at maureen.majury@bellevuecollege.edu or call 425.564.4229.

What:  Will be happening?  This group will take up new and continuing topics including:

  • Industry Panel discuss disruptive technologies impacting workforce and IT programs (robotics, automation, entertainment technology, security, hacking, web design/UX, and data analytics),
  • IBM Research, Dr. Yunyao Li, will present on SystemT: An Algebraic Approach to Declarative Information Extraction
  • Discuss four additional courses to add to the suite of ten IT CTC courses,
  • A robotic presentation by Spokane Valley’s Mark Neufville who will also demonstrate the Center’s NAO robot,
  • IT program marketing materials presentation,
  • Progress on the exploratory research of state robotics/drone workforce demand, curriculum, and academic and career pathways,
  • Hot topics and areas of interest for the IT faculty community,
  • And, assess how the IT Faculty Forum is being used.

The 2016 Agenda

Read Dr. Yunyao Li’s biography hereYunYao Li IBM

 

 

 

Where:  Mercer Island Community & Event Center, 8236 SE 24th Street, Mercer Island, WA 98040/tel (206) 275-7609, The Mercer Room.

When:  9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Thursday, May 19, 2016 & 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Friday, May 20, 2016. (Note: Agenda times subject to change and will be finalized when you receive your final confirmations, for most at the end of March 2016.)

Why:  We are entering a stage of incredibly fast and disruptive technology.  How are our IT programs and CTC IT faculty preparing for these kinds of rapid changes? This is the overarching theme of this two day event.  We will have frank discussions with our panel, brainstorm, and consider how we can best prepare our students in IT as well as attract students into IT as their job prospects look more robust compared to other industry sectors.

Requirements:
1.  After you register, you will be sent materials to consider and be ready to discuss.  You will also receive an agenda for the two-day event as we come closer to the May event.
2. Register by April 29, 2016.
3. Review materials that will be sent to you before the Summit and be prepared to discuss, brainstorm, and make decisions.
4.  If possible bring your laptop or tablet.  There is wifi at the event.
Food will be provided (Thursday: breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack, Friday: breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack).
Recommended hotel:  The Hyatt House near Bellevue College (easy access to 1-90, and then you can hop off and reach the Mercer Island Community Center very easily). However, for our out-of-town guests, with the stipend you can decide where you want to stay.  Mention my name, the Center of Excellence, and Bellevue College to get the government rate.
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Find Out About the CoE for ICT from Advisory Board Member, Valerie Goulds, Microsoft

Industry Advisory Board Shares Their Perspective on IT and Contributions to the CoE for ICT Valerie Goulds Microsoft EngineerClick on image to play.

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IT Workforce Demand & Technology Trends Panel (Aligning Demand, Skills & Training with Industry Needs) September 30, 2014

Partnering with Industry is Instrumental to a Center of Excellence's Success

The Center of Excellence assembled an IT industry panel for the “The HR Policy Foundation Workforce Development Roundtable and the Community College Workforce Consortium” on September 30, 2014. Click on the image above to view the video.

You can upload the PowerPoint Presentation here.

Partnering with Industry PPT 093014

 

 

 

The panel consisted of:

  • Jonny Chambers, Microsoft
  • Rich James, F5 Networks
  • Eden Lasatar, Bellevue College
  • Chris Orth, Game Dev. Education
  • Juan Ulloa, EagleView Technologies
  • Valerie Goulds, Microsoft

The panel focused on their experiences both with Center initiatives, activities, projects/products related to workforce demand. The panelists also discussed and expanded upon their contributions to a recent Center report, Building an IT-Ready Washington: 2015 and Beyond. The report is a practical resource for IT faculty and student. It offers sound, practical tips, tools, and resources to improve the quality of the classroom experience as well as generate more well-rounded and work- and IT-ready graduates.

Maureen Majury, M.Ed., Director for the Center facilitated the hour-long panel session.

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News & Updates: Fall 2014

CoE Logo 2

Updates & News Fall 2014

Updates & News: Fall 2014

The Center of Excellence for Information and Computing Technology welcomes all our IT faculty, Workforce Administrators, and student to fall quarter 2014. The Center and a number of our faculty have been hard at work working on initiatives, projects, services, and products over the summer that we would like to share with you.

IT Program Marketing Plan

IT Program Marketing Initiative: Our state’s CTC IT programs are accessible, affordable, provide excellent support, and are adaptable to new and emerging technologies. They provide a variety of options for students who want to pursue an IT career pathway ranging from certificates, to degrees (both two- and four-year) that need to be highlighted. As articulated by faculty from across our state during the IT Futures Summit (May 2014), awareness by students and parents about CTC IT program options is not where we want it to be.

Thus, the Center and a leadership team of IT faculty and administrators have created a plan to address this. The Center has developed, with the IT program marketing leadership team, an RFP to hire the services of a marketing/advertising firm to create an information and awareness IT program campaign.

The purpose is to ensure our state’s students, parents, and educators are aware of the wide variety of IT programs available to them. The rationale is to not only increase FTEs, but to increase the number of students getting a quality education in order to enter the workforce.

Please contact the Center to request a copy of the RFP to review prior to its publication late- September/mid-October.

The Ideal IT Student

Ideal IT Graduate High Level

Building an IT-Ready Washington: 2015 and Beyond outlines the in-demand technical skills and knowledge, including employability skills, IT students should become familiar with as they are required by prospective employees. The information, resources, and expansion on what these technical knowledge and skills are, and why they are important increases the probability the IT student will be prepared to meet their future employer’s job requirements and responsibilities.  This report showcases and details a compilation of standards for IT students and educators in creating clearer expectations of what an IT program should be offering in terms of content. Essentially, these highly desirable attributes, as identified by a team of IT professionals, should be absorbed into the student’s lexicon upon graduation. There are six sections to this report, for a total of 48 pages.

It is easy to read, easy to use, and provides you with the latest technology trends and curriculum recommendations based upon input from IT industry professionals and the latest in IT research.

Mercer Island Community & Event Center

IT Common Courses

IT faculty from around the state assembled in May 2014 at the Mercer Island Community and Event Center for the Creating IT Futures Summit 2014.  They came to consensus on the six IT common courses they had been working on over the last two years.

  • Here is a list of the final six courses, including naming and numbering conventions.
  • IT faculty will continue with IT common course work with additional courses that they selected for the next round, as well as creating a statewide CTC IT program marketing plan that the Center will be funding.

In order to begin work on the next series of common IT courses, please complete this new survey by Friday, October 15, 2014.

  • You will be reviewing four new IT common courses and providing any edits/suggestions/etc.
  • Be asked to provide feedback, including proposing what the student might be able to do by the end of the course, as well as suggested prerequisites for the course.
  • Is there a fifth course that should be included?
  • The Creating IT Futures Summit is tentatively scheduled for May 14/15 at the Mercer Island Community & Event Center (Note: The Center will cover travel expenses for faculty traveling more than 75 miles), and we want you to save the date, as well as indicate if you can attend.

Off to A Future in IT

IT Applied Baccalaureate (BAS) Degrees

A resource section has been created on the Center’s website to house all things IT BAS.  Colleges who would like to share resources, curriculum, proposals, etc. are invited to submit them to the Center.  There has also been a decision made by IT faculty on the standardization of IT BAS degree titles, that the State Board will be adopting moving forward.

Look for more updates, including options for having your college’s IT program reviewed, two new summits, and information about a college consortium opportunity to participate in a MTA Microsoft certification subscription plan.

IT Program Reviews & IT-Applied Baccalaureate (AB) Degrees

The Center will again be performing IT program (degree/certificate) reviews at no charge to a college.  Two open spots remain for the free review.  If you are interested, please contact the Center of Excellence.

Additionally, if your college is either planning to, or already engaged in offering an IT-Applied Baccalaureate degree, the Center also can review, perform research, or offer consulting services towards that effort.

 

CoE Logo 2

Please contact the Center with any questions, suggestions, or to request subscription to the Center’s “News & Updates”
by contacting Maureen Majury, Director, at maureen.majury@bellevuecollege.edu.

 

 

 

 

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Centers of Excellence

Developing partnerships among business, industry and education to meet the future needs of Washington State.