Events

2013 IT Pathways Summit ROI and Evaluative Data

Evaluations: 2013

Evaluations: 2013

Evaluation Data and Return on Investment

2013 Pathways to IT Applied Baccalaureate Degrees for Washington State Students Summit

Friday, June 7, 2013

Attendance: 131

Please rate your satisfaction by filling in the number that corresponds accurately with your response:

1 = Not at All, 2 = Slightly Satisfactory, 3 = Satisfactory, 4 = Above Satisfactory, 5 = Very

On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), Edward Esparza’s State Board for Technical and Community College’s Presentation, (an overview of the applied baccalaureate process, as well as updates), was informative and helpful. 78%
On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), the updates by the colleges on where each college was in developing/launching their IT applied baccalaureates (Bellevue, Columbia Basin, Green River, Highline, North Seattle [Seattle Community Colleges], and Olympic Colleges) was informative and helpful. 80%
On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), the common course work session (work-to-date and developing common outcomes for a networking and database courses) was informative and helpful. 88%
On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), Keith Loeber’s presentation on “Microsoft’s Perspective on IT Applied Baccalaureates” was informative and helpful. 91%
On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), the industry round-table focusing on a review of current and proposed IT applied baccalaureate degrees was informative and helpful. 93%
On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), the secondary education and IT Programs of Study round-table session was informative and helpful. 79%
On a scale of 1 (not at all), 3 (satisfactory) and 5 (very), logistics, including registration and food, was well done. 95%
Overall, the IT Pathways Summit was a worthwhile event. 100%

Keynote/Presenter/Session Comments:

Edward Esparza’s State Board for Technical and Community College’s Presentation, (an overview of the applied baccalaureate process, as well as updates), was informative and helpful.

  • An overview of the subject that would have been more useful to me.

Updates by the colleges on where each college was in developing/launching their IT applied baccalaureates (Bellevue, Columbia Basin, Green River, Highline, North Seattle [Seattle Community Colleges]

  • Got a good sense of the variety of programs and the requirements for creating one.
  • Perhaps TOO brief. Could have shared more about target employment, choice of courses, expected student mix.
  • Good to know information.

Common course work session (work-to-date and developing common outcomes for a networking and database courses)

  • Collegial way to confirm best practices
  • I’d consider having a handout of Bloom’s Taxonomy and/or a cheat sheet on writing effective course objectives to frame the discussion. This was a challenging activity as it is sometimes difficult to bridge philosophical differences in finding a common course.
  • Our table had substantive valuable discussions.
  • Much of this work is so very controversial, it will be interesting to see if it truly pans out.
  • I don’t know how useful it was, but it was very fun to discuss the curriculum with faculty from other colleges. Really enjoyed!

Keith Loeber’s presentation on “Microsoft’s Perspective on IT Applied Baccalaureates”

  • Interesting presentation about Microsoft products and support, not as closely tied to baccalaureate programs as hoped.
  • Will his PT deck be made public? (2)  A request has been made. We hope to post it soon, and let the attendees know.

Industry round-tables focusing on a review of current and proposed IT applied baccalaureate degrees

  • Industry presenters at my table were full of good information
  • We had an excellent discussion – learned a lot. Good industry reps

Secondary education and IT Programs of Study round-table session Great!

  • I knew most of what came up by virtue of articulation discussions with local high schools
  • Questions resulted in answers that might not change anything. Problem was identified as systemic, but no solutions were possible.

Logistics, including registration and food

  • Best breakfast and one of the best lunches I’ve ever had at a conference. Registration was efficient. It would have been nice to break out the discussions into different rooms, to make it easier to hear around our work tables.
  • Maureen Majury is the best conference organizer around.
  • While it was a great facility with fantastic food and service for a large conference (we knew we weren’t on a CC campus!), the breakout sessions–everyone in one big, noisy room–were acoustically challenging.
  • Excellent vegetarian options for food. Registration was easy. Location and venue were very nice.

Overall, the IT Pathways Summit was a worthwhile event.

  • I have a much clearer idea of what is being done and what is needed in IT higher ed in WA State.
  • Thanks for putting this event on.
  • Really helpful event for those either pursuing or planning to pursue BAS program development. Really good chance to network with peers.
  • It was just great to see what other schools are doing. These events always re-inspire me!

 

Return on Investment Breakdown:

Actual Expenses

Facility $1,248 ($4,100*)
Food $6,048
Material (Printed, badges) $724
Speaker/Industry Expert Time/Travel $1,1416 ($5,984)* 

Facilitators Time $3,335 ($6,750)

Video Filming $975 ($7,500*)
Labor $3,880 ($1,500*) 

Travel Reimbursement Faculty $5,498

Total $20,744 Actual Expenses ($25,834*/In-Kind)

 

ROI and Systems Saving Data

Expenditures totaled $20,744.  The in-kind/donations totaled $25,834 (denoted by *) and covered 55% of the total costs associated with this event.

If in-kind donations had not been solicited it would have adversely affected the quality of the event, while at the same time increase the total CoE funds needed to cover expenses. If approximately $158 dollars per attendee had been charged to cover actual CoE expenses it would have negatively impacted CTC professional development dollars available to faculty and it would have adversely impacted access for faculty whose respective colleges couldn’t afford approximately $250 to $450 to send between three and four faculty to the Summit, including covering the travel costs for northwest, southwest, central and eastern Washington. If faculty paid a minimum of $350 to attend an alternate, one-day for-profit event featuring IT industry speakers, panelists, subject matter experts discussing and demonstrating new IT products, emerging technologies, how to use them in their classroom, and advice on how to update IT programs to meet changing industry needs, it would cost the state and taxpayers approximately $45,850.

The IT Futures Summit at a cost $158 per participant (this does not include the associated financial value of the in-kind donations), saved $25,106.  If the in-kind savings were included it saved $50,940.

 

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